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Christina ; 19 ; NYC
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last.fm

Thursday, September 18, 2014

(Source: yousillysillygirl)

allthecanadianpolitics:

Aboriginal women ask Stephen Harper: Am I next?

Am I next?

That’s the question aboriginal women are asking Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a new online campaign to renew pressure on his government to call a national inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women.

Coming on the heels of Harper’s "sociological phenomenon" blunder, the campaign is the brainchild of Holly Jarrett. She’s the cousin of Loretta Saunders, a 26-year-old Inuit student at Saint Mary’s University who was murdered earlier this year. At the time of her death, Saunders was working on her thesis on murdered and missing aboriginal women.

"She had come through a lot of the same kind of struggles that a lot women affected by colonialism and residential school stuff," Jarrett told PressProgress Friday, a day after  launching the Am I Next campaign.

"We wanted to move it forward for her. She was really passionate about telling her story, to stand up and tell the brutal truth," said Jarrett, an Inuit from the Labrador coast who’s now based in Hamilton, Ont.

After organizing one of the largest petitions at change.org calling on the government to launch a public inquiry into hundreds of missing and murdered aboriginal women, Jarrett decided to launch the Am I Next campaign.

It’s inspired by the Inuktitut word ain, a term of endearment for someone you love in her native language.

Here are some of the faces of the viral campaign:

factualfeminist:

We can’t forget about this. It’s still going on.

(Source: cerulean-warbler)

boyirl:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

boyirl:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

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fresh air

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    white as a toilet

      "

      When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

      Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

      The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

      "
      Ann Druyan (via whats-out-there)
      8:40 am →
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      What's Out There

        Tuesday, September 16, 2014

        gothsportscore:

        i don’t want to be a part of a college system where plagiarism is a worse crime than rape

        11:19 pm →
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        Phosphidae

          Monday, September 15, 2014

          (Source: nickjbarlow)

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          My brain exploded

            siddharthasmama:

this is a war-cry from 60 years ago that is still being shouted today.

            siddharthasmama:

            this is a war-cry from 60 years ago that is still being shouted today.

            (Source: Anarcho-Communist Solidarity Alliance)

            centralist:

This is the best gif of all time

            centralist:

            This is the best gif of all time

            (Source: marioissexy2)

            Sunday, September 14, 2014
            amerahames:

the fragility

            amerahames:

            the fragility

            "There’s more to us than the moment we made a bad decision."
            Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan, via Huffington Post, July 16, 2014. (via funkypoolparty)

            (Source: bedsider)

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            Bedsider

              surf4ces:

              omfg

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              baby,

                Saturday, September 13, 2014

                barafurbear:

                anotheralexandros:

                tommytv:

                nychealth:

                Let’s stop HIV in New York City

                • If you are HIV-negative, PEP and PrEP can help you stay that way.
                • If you are HIV-positive, PEP and PrEP can help protect your partners.

                 

                Daily PrEP

                PrEP is a daily pill that can help keep you HIV-negative as long as you take it every day.

                • Ask your doctor if PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) may be right for you.
                • Condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.

                 

                Emergency PEP

                If you are HIV-negative and think you were exposed to HIV, immediately go to a clinic or emergency room and ask for PEP (Post-exposure  Prophylaxis).

                • PEP can stop HIV if started within 36 hours of exposure.
                • You continue taking PEP for 28 days.

                Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PEP and PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured. Visit NYC Health’s website to find out where to get PrEP or PEP in New York City.

                This is such a giant step that barely any people know about it seems, so amazing to see progress in the treatment of HIV

                I honestly thought this might be exaggeration but the CDC says that PrEP is 92% effective. Damn. Damn.

                reblogging because this deserves waaaay more attention D:

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